Fort Worth Animal Care cares for a large number of pets

title=wpil_keyword_linkAnimal Shelter has nearly 1,000 dogs in its care, nearly 90 of which are housed in outdoor kennels and the inevitable space euthanasia happens every week, according to a group of volunteers.” title=”The Fort Worth Animal Shelter has nearly 1,000 dogs in its care, nearly 90 of which are housed in outdoor kennels and the inevitable space euthanasia happens every week, according to a group of volunteers.” loading=”lazy”/>

The Fort Worth Animal Shelter has nearly 1,000 dogs in its care, nearly 90 of which are housed in outdoor kennels and the inevitable space euthanasia happens every week, according to a group of volunteers.

Fort Worth Animal Care & Control has nearly 1,000 dogs in its shelters, according to shelter volunteers. Nearly 90 of the dogs live in outdoor kennels. In March, the shelters welcomed more than 1,400 dogs.

Shelters are well past their maximum capacity of 850 animals, which means more animals being euthanized, a group of volunteers said in an emailed statement. Lately, about 20 dogs have been euthanized a week, a volunteer said. Sometimes more, sometimes less.

The problem is not new, but it is getting worse.

In February, the shelter said it had more than 800 cats and dogs up for adoption. As of Friday, the city’s website listed more than 990 dogs and more than 100 cats for adoption.

Fort Worth Animal Care and Control executives say much of that is because Fort Worth is growing.

“And the bigger we get, the more animals we’ll have,” Chris Lirette, the city’s animal control supervisor, said in February.

Shelter volunteers said it was also because of irresponsible pet owners. Pet owners who don’t microchip their dogs, neuter them, abuse them, and those who can’t or don’t want to care for them and take them to the shelter have helped a lot.

Volunteers ask the community to help save dogs that are euthanized. Volunteers said the shelter was doing nothing to cause overcrowding and that volunteers and staff were doing everything possible to avoid euthanizing dogs for space. The shelter only does this because they have no other options, the volunteers said.

Some of that is just helping to make sure the dogs don’t end up at the shelter, volunteers said. Spaying and neutering your dog can prevent him from raising litters of puppies that can’t be properly cared for or aren’t wanted. These puppies can end up at the shelter.

Shelter volunteers also suggested taking a dog out for a few hours. The shelter allows you to take the dogs out for a walk, to go to the park or to hang out with you for a day, then to leave. This helps dogs by getting them out of the shelter environment for a little while (yes, dogs have mental health needs too), but also giving the shelter more information about how the dog is behaving. in the world. This can help them adopt the dog.

Adopting a dog would be one of the best ways to help, but shelter volunteers say prospective dog owners should first make sure they can care for a dog. Make sure you can make the time to care for him, have the money to feed him, take him to the vet and have him groomed regularly and that you get a dog whose personality and personality you can handle. the temperament.

Welcoming a dog, which many shelter volunteers do, is another great way to help, they said. Adopting a dog means bringing it home until a permanent adoptive owner can be found. The shelter provides food, treats, beds, crates, leashes, and other basic supplies that are available based on donations the shelter receives.

If you would like to help but cannot adopt or foster a dog, the shelter volunteers recommend that you join them at the shelter to care for the animals.

And anyone can donate. Volunteers said donations of household items such as newspapers, old towels, blankets and cleaning supplies were particularly needed. Supplies for dog foster homes, like the ones listed above, are other great options. Cash donations can also be made to the shelter.

Any donated canned dog food should have pop tops, and the shelter does not accept Alpo or Old Roy brands.

For more information, visit fortworthtexas.gov/animals.

This story was originally published April 15, 2022 6:29 p.m.

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James Hartley is a breaking news reporter at the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. He’s a North Texas native who joined the Star-Telegram team during an internship in 2019 and just didn’t leave. He is passionate about true stories and likes sober films, good tea and scotch out of his budget.

Boyd S. Abbott